Home furnishings with clean lines have a classic appeal. The antiques below were ahead of their time, with a quality and sensibility that make them timeless.

  • Dresser teapot. Christopher Dresser, one of the first industrial designers, made this minimalist teapot circa 1880. The piece was prominently featured in a Cooper-Hewitt exhibition entitled “Shock of the Old”. The handle was designed to make the pot easier to pour — an early example of “form follows function“.
Teapot, Christopher Dresser c. 1880 Manufactured by James Dixon and Sons

Teapot, Christopher Dresser c. 1880
Manufactured by James Dixon and Sons

 

  • Shaker boxes. These bent wood boxes, on view at the Belleveue Arts Museum in Washington State, were crafted circa 1840 in a Shaker community in Mount Lebanon, NY.
Shaker Boxes

Image via Bellevue Arts Museum

 

  • Godwin Side Table. Edward William Godwin designed this walnut side table circa 1872. The notable piece is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which states that:

“The elegantly linear design of the table reflects Godwin’s knowledge of Japanese art and its principles.”

 

Godwin side table

Godwin side table

 

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