Did you attend Boston First Night? If so, you’ll remember that it rained quite a bit, and was so warm that the public worried that the celebrated ice sculpture artists wouldn’t be able to carve the ice at all, or that the resulting sculptures wouldn’t last. Fortunately, the temperatures dropped low enough that the 2015 Boston First Night sculptures were able to be enjoyed through New Year’s (where’s a little of that aforementioned warmth now?)

Some people might argue that Boston had seen enough ice, but the sublime work of ice-sculptor Donald Chapelle proved otherwise. Source: Donald Chapelle

Some people might argue that Boston had seen enough ice, but the sublime work of ice-sculptor Donald Chapelle proved otherwise. Source: Donald Chapelle

That’s the nature of art in action. Whether it be the traditional Boston First Night or the annual Sandcastle Competition in greater Boston, those who work outdoors and with the elements to create art are willing to take a risk that their works may not come to fruition after all, or may not last more than a few minutes, a few hours, or a few days before they are dissolved back into nature.

Photographer Joshua Nowicki captured this awesome image of wind eroding the frozen sand at Silver Beach County Park in St. Joseph, MI.  Source: Joshua Nowicki

Photographer Joshua Nowicki captured this awesome image of wind eroding the frozen sand at Silver Beach County Park in St. Joseph, MI. Source: Joshua Nowicki

As architects who strive to design and build structural art that lasts, we have a hearty respect for those who create art in action. While construction projects may suffer delays as a result of Mother Nature, the artist in action may not get to see his or her work realized.  Or, the artist may work diligently, only to have the work go unappreciated if weather keeps the predicted crowds at home.

Looking for help with you latest artistic endeavors? Contact your team at Leslie Saul! Source: Donald Chapelle

Looking for help with you latest artistic endeavors? Contact your team at Leslie Saul! Source: Donald Chapelle

But let’s not put too much blame on Mother Nature. She is an artist in action herself, as these amazing wind-crafted sculptures on Lake Michigan’s shoreline can attest. The sculptures were the result of a trifecta of climatic events, including sub-freezing temperatures and high winds. The result were striking sand towers, the highest of which was one foot high, wind-carved in much the way as Utah’s famous sandstone hoodoos. The photos were taken by a photographer and university student, Joshua Nowicki, in February. By the time he was ready to shoot another round, the sculptures were already melting away.

Ready to create art that lasts? Schedule a consultation with Leslie Saul & Associates Architecture and Interiors.